Louise de Budos, Duchess of Montmorency

Let us try to unravel this business.  Everything starts by a bewitchment, that is to say by a magic ring which appears to have made the Connetable fall under Louise’s charm.  She and her family are evidently convinced that certain objects can be loaded with power…

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This could be considered just credulity.  But it is not only animists, throughout the world, who believe that matter is connected to something which goes beyond appearance.

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Bewitchment is a reality, which often passes through the intermediary of an object, serving as a sort of “psychic condenser”…  Rings are very often the support for this force.  In Ancient Greece it was believed so much that priests were forbidden to wear them, so that their powers came only from the divinity…  In Oriental tales, there are prodigies operated by rings everywhere, that of Solomon notably, which commanded the whole of Nature and whose owner would be master of the world…

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Bewitchment phenomena are of all times and of all civilizations.  Plato talks about some.  So do the Scriptures.

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The year of Louise’s death is also that of one of the most resounding affairs of witchcraft in the XVIth Century, that of Father Aupetit, from Pageas in Limousin, who confessed under torture to have seen the devil.  Saint-Simon himself is also convinced that, in the case of Louise, Satan was at work, since like L’Estoile, one hundred years before, he speaks of a smell of sulphur, which filled the dead woman’s chamber.

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The frightful position of the body when it is found could have been caused by an attack of hysteria or by diabolic possession, whose specialists would say that it engenders deployments of prodigious physical force, bodily violences and mutilations, which are medically inexplicable.

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The rest of the story recalls the theme of the White Lady.  Grey or white, she is there to announce a death, to protect, or to comfort.  Like the one who helps the dying in a London hospital and who is seen so regularly, that Doctor Paul Turner had an investigation carried out, which concluded that the phenomenon was real.  The lady in question, dressed in grey, is standing at the foot of the bed or seated near the stove, and even gives glasses of water to the sick, but each of her apparitions ineluctably precedes the death of those who see her.  Even if everything indicates that the sick person will apparently recover…

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Let us just say that she appears on the spatial scene when the temporal scene has already accomplished its revolution…  attracting the person living on borrowed time.

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Louis Pauwels finds that the hypothesis which satisfies him the most is that of psychometric vision…

Psychometric vision is the perception, usually by a person endowed with mediumnic faculties, of images representing scenes which have unfolded in the past, at the same place.  These images are “true”, that is to say that they have an objective reality, exterior to the brain which capts them.  They usually appear through the intermediary of an object having belonged to the person who is seen like this.  As for the mechanism which provokes this projection of images, it is inexplicable…

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That such images can form, appears to be of capital importance.  Not because they make perfectly forgotten people and situations resurge from the past, often with great precision.  Not even very much because they project the anecdotic or premonitory “double” of important historical events.  But because, in their way, they open the space-time lock that our limited concepts have put in place for so long…  Locking away powers, which, liberated, would allow Humanity to resolve a lot of problems that have been insoluble until now…

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