Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec by Henri Rachon.

Toulouse-Lautrec doubtless died an alcoholic, although it is not certain.  But the demand that he makes to the nun for absinthe conforms with reality, so does his anger, as well as the rictus of the drinker.  When Victor, the waiter at the Apollo Bar, did not bring his green liqueur fast enough, he threw terrible tantrums…

***

It is not certain that he had never been to the castle.  Toulouse-Lautrec was born in 1864 and the nuns only settled there around 1888.  In any case, he knew the tower and its occupants since he wrote to his mother

“I can amuse myself well and do anything I want since Maman is supporting, in our old tower at Boussagues, some nuns whose principal function is to pray for my soul’s salvation and who climb up and down inside their donjon like frogs in a bowl!…”

***

The Boussagues donjon.

Like all cases of haunting, three explanations are possible.  The nun, who was certainly a medium, had given birth to a ghost and was acting unconsciously on him by dictating a comportment to him that she knew he had had while alive.  But in this case, the explanation of “hallucinatory haunting” is to be excluded.  Two other explanations remain:  either that the nun had played the role of intermediary, of catalyser of an exterior force, the spirit of Toulouse-Lautrec, or that she had been able to receive an impregnation with which the walls of the tower were charged.  It is the typical case of the ghost that Chateaubriand was able to see in his adolescence, and whose image had been imbibing the walls of Combourg Castle for centuries…

***

Numerous authors who have studied the question think that walls are only inert in appearance.  That they impregnate themselves by swallowing all the joys, sufferings, cries of hate, of agony or of love to which they are witnesses.  That they are also capable of restituting them in the form of radiations from which certain people are able to reconstitute, “reincorporate”, the memories that they have accumulated.  For Roger de Lafforest, everything that unfolds inside four walls creates an atmosphere composed of innumerable micro-vibrations which “stud the inert decor of everyday existence, leaving scars which are even deeper in that the impact has been more violent and more repeated”

***

Toulouse-Lautrec phtographed at the end of his life.

This is not the case here, for the painter was not a frequent visitor to the place.  However, Toulouse-Lautrec’s vitality, his “will to live”, which was prodigious (in his brief life he had accumulated an incredible quantity of drawings and paintings) were able to leave their trace in places, without him coming back to them often.  Because of his infirmity, Toulouse-Lautrec felt terrible frustrations that the audacity and aggressivity of his painting well translates.  He says of one of his mistresses, Marie:

“I hated her like anything from the first instant, but I was unable to do without her”.

It is therefore not surprising that such a temperament was able to leave some emanations in Boussagues which the castle’s particular situation contributed to fix…

***

It has been known for a long time that the situation of certain houses favourises paranormal phenomena.  Just like there are cancer houses (certain telluric forces, underground sources or wells seem to produce waves that are nocive for our cells) there are haunted or evil houses, because they are implanted, for example, on faults in the Earth’s crust.  It is the case at Boussagues, which is built on a series of fallen ground of volcanic origin, and with ancient materials, notably stones from past fortifications.  These could have been able to transmit, like perpetual accumulators and exchangers would do, that “wall memory” that the influences of micro-vibratory physics in our everyday life will one day doubtless explain.  But it is already certain that it conserves our thoughts, our actions and our words, for eternity…

***

Advertisements