Denis Saurat.

Denis Saurat remembered that the two officers in his vision, from what he “perceived”, were connected to no campaign or battle.  It then came to him that he could have been witness to a scene of military occupation carried out in execution of a treaty.  He therefore sent his daughter again to the library to bring him back a Diplomatic History of Napoleon.  When he had the work, he attentively studied all the treaties.  He soon arrived at that of Tilsit and discovered that, by the terms of this treaty, Napoleon had obtained the right to militarily occupy Germany’s South, and that the troops of his allies, the Confederation du Rhin, had advanced as far as the Bohemian forest, precisely to Fichtel Gebirge.

The operation had been executed by the German troops of Rhenania, but was commanded by French officers.

At Tilsit, Napoleon had obtained from Alexander I the right to occupy Southern Germany.

Denis Saurat understood then that the two young officers in his vision had a mission of surveillance over the passages of the troops as far as the Naab, to the East of which, in all probability, other officers would take over.

He had therefore witnessed, in his vision, in 1939, a scene which had unfolded in 1808…

***

Denis Saurat reports this vision, in all its details, in one of his most fascinating books entitled:  L’Experience de l’Au-dela.  He was very interested in dreams;  not for their Freudian signification, nor for their interpretation through any sort of “key to dreams”, but in dreams as images of the future or the past perceived during sleep.

***

In this case, it was a sort of waking dream.  At the moment when Denis Saurat saw the scene that he recounted, he was in that intermediate state between waking and sleeping, where it is enough to just close one’s eyes to see images forming.  It’s a sort of little cinema that everyone knows and of which we usually only conserve a vague memory, or even, very often, no memory at all…

***

Denis Saurat’s vision seems to have been particularly long.  The people who studied this case generally think that the exceptional length of this vision could have been due to the febrile state of the writer.  We have said that he was in bed, with the ‘flu and a high temperature.  This fever could have made the vision more precise, clearer and more stable.  For he had the time to look attentively at the map and to fix its important details in his memory.

***

The Naab and its affluents.

Thinking that he may have seen the map on a previous occasion, he did some research on it.  Knowing that he had learnt Geography from a Vidal-Lablache atlas, he looked for this book and noticed that the course of the Naab is only just indicated, without its affluents…  Which is the case in most school atlases.  And pupils are hardly able to remember the Naab after having studied the Danube basin…  Denis Saurat had never had before his eyes any detailed map of this part of Germany.  It must therefore be concluded that, on this January morning in 1939, for inexplicable reasons, (a)  he had a precise vision of an object – in this case, a map of Germany’s South;  (b)  he had witnessed a scene connected to an historical context of which he knew nothing and which he was able to reconstitute by investigating it…  Which necessarily leads to this conclusion:  that an image of the past, surging from we don’t know where, appeared in front of his half-closed eyes, one feverish evening…

***

Certain biologists think that our genes are able to channel information, and possibly images, from the past…  This could be an explanation.  If this is true, some of our dreams could be retained as documents…  One day, perhaps, we will know how to see, sort, capture and use the millions and millions of images coming from the depths of the ages, which are sleeping inside us, and to which we attach no importance.  As Jung said,

“the History of the world is perhaps written in our memory”…

***

There is another hypothesis emitted by American psychiatrists who have studied this case:  it’s that Denis Saurat had been one of the two officers in a former life…  His vision would then be only a memory of a moment lived by him in 1808.  Eminent scholars like Ian Stevenson, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Virginia, devote their careers to the exploration of the possibilities of reincarnation, and a “must-read” is the remarkable work by Isola Pisani, Mourir n’est pas mourir [Dying is not dying], on Mrs Grant-Kelsey and Doctor Kelsey who cure, in Pangbourne, in Berkshire, sixty kilometres from London, illnesses caused by a trauma suffered during a preceding life.  Dr Kelsey discovered that most psychoses and neuroses come from unconscious memories of past existences, and he evolved from this a revolutionary therapeutic method.  To put his clients into contact with images of their preceding lives, he uses hypnosis.  It could be thought that Denis Saurat found himself placed by fever in a state of consciousness close to that into which Dr Kelsey’s patients enter… 

***

Advertisements