Catherine de Medicis

The following year, in 1560, Francois II dies, after one year’s reign.  Charles IX succeeds him and dies after fourteen years, haunted by the phantoms of the Saint-Barthelemy massacre.  Then Henri III mounts the throne for fifteen years and is killed by a knife wound in the abdomen, by the monk Jacques Clement.  The preceding year, he had had the Duke de Guise assassinated.  Then, young Francois having succumbed to a galloping phthisis and the Valois branch being extinct, Henri de Bourbon becomes king under the name of Henri IV and reigns twenty years and nine months…

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This story is recounted by two historians from the XVIIth Century:  Simon Goulard, in his Tresor d’histoires admirables, and Andre Felibien, in his Maisons royales.

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Trickery by Ruggieri has been mentioned…  It has been said that he had perhaps used a sort of magic lantern, which is not impossible, for the magic lantern existed at this epoch.  It was even used in places of ill repute to project plates of doubtful propriety.  More or less the ancestor of erotic cinema.

It has also been said that Ruggieri had hidden disguised people and made them appear by a manipulation of mirrors…  This is not impossible either.  But neither of these tricks would explain the predictions contained in the vision.  For the people who appeared in the mirror made the number of turns which correspond exactly to the number of years of their reigns…  There are also a number of troubling details.  Charles IX pushing away frightening visions…  This is exactly what happened:  at the end of his life, he was haunted by the memory of the Saint-Barthelemy massacre;  he couldn’t sleep;  he cried out at night…  Henri III who firstly sees a body stretched out at his feet:  that of the Duke de Guise assassinated by his order;  then holds his abdomen at the end of the fifteenth turn:  a gesture which corresponds to the attitude he will have when the monk Jacques Clement stabs him in the abdomen…  The apparition of Henri de Bourbon, which wasn’t at all forseeable when this scene took place in 1559.  For Catherine de Medicis then had every reason to believe that the House of Valois would reign for a long time.  There were four heirs to the throne.  No-one thought that it would be necessary to turn to the Bourbons in Saint Louis’ genealogical tree.  No-one.  And Henri de Bourbon, the future Henri IV, appears in the mirror…  So, if it was only trickery, it was accompanied by a real clairvoyancy gift…

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Cristallomancy is an extremely ancient form of divination.  It is reported that Pythagorus possessed a magic mirror which he presented to the moon’s face to see images of the future appear in it.  As well as that, our popular literature, our fairy-tales, our legends, are filled with people who use mirrors, or the surface of water, to see distant events unroll.

Today, throughout the whole world, there are very serious researchers who study myths, fairy-tales and popular legends with a lot of care.  And certain think to find in them, not, as it has been believed for a long time, just stories to put children to sleep, but interpretations of real facts going back to very ancient times, to civilizations completely forgotten today.  However, mythologists are not in agreement on the nature of these civilizations.  According to some, the ancient societies, whose legends relate certain events in fairy-tale form, had come to a very high technological level.  They had engines permitting them to move in the air, on the ground, under water.  They possessed machines capable of transmitting sounds and images, terrifying weapons, extraordinary energy sources, in other words, the equivalent of our aeroplanes, cars, submarines, radio, televison, lasers, atomic bombs, without counting the techniques still to be invented, and they mastered forces which are still unknown to us.

After a planetary cataclysm – perhaps an atomic catastrophe – this civilization was annihilated.  The rare survivors then told stories about it to their descendants, which, in time, became more and more incomprehensible and finished up taking on a fabulous allure.  Incapable of conceiving that men had been able to fly, travel enormous distances in a few minutes, watch the images of a distant event, talk to each other from one town to another, light up palaces by pushing a button, record the human voice, our ancestors invented the marvellous.  Engines become monsters, machines are magic objects, and the stories, transformed into legends, are peopled with dragons, chimera, water spirits, fairies, wizards, all endowed with flying chariots, magic wands and seven league boots…

Other myth historians propose a different hypothesis.  According to them, our stories and legends are not deformed echoes of an ancient civilization of technological essence.  They more or less reflect – I quote – “the nostalgia of unused human possibilities”…

These myth specialists explain that Man, to become master of the world, had two paths at his disposal:  the coarse way and the subtle way.  [Personally, I would use the words material and spiritual.]  The coarse way is the one that we have chosen.  It led us to invent the telephone, the radio, television, railways, cars, aeroplanes, rockets, the cinema, the atomic bomb, etc.,  in other words, objects.  The subtle way is the one that only uses all the resources and all of the faculties of the human spirit:  telepathy, levitation, clairvoyancy, telekinesis, bilocation, etc.  Faculties which, these authors note, have become atrophied, through lack of use, since we have taken the “coarse” road.

This would mean that for thousands of years, men invented stories peopled with beings endowed with all of the extraordinary faculties that they unconsciously suffer to leave unused:  for example, the possibility of flying through the air, communicating by thought, influencing cosmic forces, conversing with animals, becoming invisible, strolling through time and… the faculty of capting images of the future or the past and making them appear on the surface of a mirror…

To be continued.

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