30

 

When the Year Thousand that comes after Year Thousand begins

Man will have entered into the dark labyrinth

He will be afraid and he will close his eyes for he will no longer want to see

He will be wary of everything and afraid at every step

But still he will be pushed onward for no halt will be allowed him.

 

Even though the voice of Cassandra will be loud and strong

He will not hear it

For he will want to possess more and more and his head will be lost in mirages

Those who govern him will deceive him

And there will be only bad shepherds.

 

In this prophecy, John gives us a last disturbing picture of our life today.  He tells us that we have entered a dark labyrinth and are afraid, but that we just close our eyes and keep rushing forward.

Our lives do not allow us to stop and reflect on which direction we should be taking.  As individuals, we have stopped thinking.  We go where we are pushed, and we are continually being pushed.

According to the Iliad, Homer’s epic work about the Trojan wars, Cassandra was the daughter of Priam, the last king of Troy, and of Hecuba, his wife.  Hector and Paris were two of her brothers.  She was a priestess of Athena, Greek goddess of Thought, the Arts, the Sciences and of Industry, for whom Athens was named.

Cassandra was desired by Apollo, god of Beauty, Light, Prophecy and the Arts, who gave her the gift of prophecy.  She refused his advances and, although he couldn’t take back his gift, he modified it so that, even though she was accurately predicting the future, no-one ever believed her.

Kidnapped from the temple of Athena by Ajax, the Locrian King’s son, she warned the Greeks that, if they attacked Troy, it would end in disaster.  No-one listened to her, the attack went ahead, and the subsequent wars dragged on for years, killing off the cream of Greek and Trojan young men.  A few natural disasters also contributed to the catastrophe.  (If anyone is interested, Athena punished Ajax for kidnapping her priestess, by having him drown in a shipwreck.)

By evoking Cassandra, John is reminding us that, even though there are people warning us about the disastrous road we are travelling, we don’t believe them.  He tells us that we want more and more possessions, and that we are caught up in artificially created, or modified, images.

He tells us that our politicians are lying to us and that we are not being properly guided.

We are now starting the tenth year of this millenium, and already we can see some signs that things are beginning to change.  Even a few of our politicians are starting to show some signs of more responsible behaviour.

Tomorrow we will start on John’s ten predictions for our future.  Unlike other prophets, Biblical or otherwise, John refuses the theme of the end of the world.  He is totally optimistic.

After these last thirty days of doom and gloom, join me tomorrow to watch the Light starting to spread over the Earth.

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